5 Ways to Land a Temp Job

In recent years, America has seen a steady rise of of non-traditional workers and jobs, including temporary workers, independent contingent workers, freelancers, and consultants.

Landing a Temporary Job

With a healing economy, younger generations are especially drawn to temporary positions, and even work in the lines of entrepreneurship and freelancing. Many worry that social security benefits won’t be around much longer or they’ll be laid off. Temporary work is a better fit.

Every week, roughly 3 million Americans work for temporary agencies and temporary employers. On average, short term work lasts 11 weeks.

There are plenty of benefits for those seeking temporary positions and seasonal work. However, there are do’s and don’ts to landing a temp job. Let’s look at 5 ways to landing short term work.

Getting the Job

Consider All Your Options Before Choosing Your Temp Job

Some temporary jobs may lead to full time employment or a career. If you have more than one option to consider, sit down and think them through.

Then decide which job is the best choice for your situation. Consider time, pay, hours, benefits, and if there’s a chance to secure a full time position.

 Don’t Overdo Your Resume

Avoid stuffing your resume with information that will shout ‘overqualified.’ If you appear too qualified to a recruiter or temporary agency representative, it could make it more difficult for you to land any short term work.

Instead of dropping big names and corporate jargon in your resume, focus instead on your work ethic and how well you work with people. Don’t lie on your resume, but tone it down.

Prepare for the Interview

When preparing for the interview, keep the company’s and the interviewer’s perspectives in mind. An interviewer needs to know three things: Are you qualified? Will you fit in? And, will you cause any issues?

 Use the interview to show off your people skills and your maturity. If you’re overqualified for the position, emphasize you’re great with people and you get along with everyone.

Related: The Top 7 Reasons Why You Should Consider Temporary Freelance Work

Stay Genuine

Regardless of how much debt you’re in, or how you got laid off from the company you’ve been with for over 20 years, avoid going over the top with any unfortunate situations. If all you do is talk about your grievances, your employer could read it as insincere and desperate.

Be Honest

Don’t lie. But also be honest with your employer about whether or not you’d like to work long term in the future. If you don’t plan on turning your freelance or short term job into anything long term, be up front. That way, there aren’t any surprises for your employer once you’re hired.

If you’re looking for seasonal work, internships, consulting gigs, and freelancing work, check out our page to learn more about how we can connect you with employers.

 

 

 

 

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