5 Ways to Land a Temp Job

In recent years, America has seen a steady rise of of non-traditional workers and jobs, including temporary workers, independent contingent workers, freelancers, and consultants.

Landing a Temporary Job

With a healing economy, younger generations are especially drawn to temporary positions, and even work in the lines of entrepreneurship and freelancing. Many worry that social security benefits won’t be around much longer or they’ll be laid off. Temporary work is a better fit.

Every week, roughly 3 million Americans work for temporary agencies and temporary employers. On average, short term work lasts 11 weeks.

There are plenty of benefits for those seeking temporary positions and seasonal work. However, there are do’s and don’ts to landing a temp job. Let’s look at 5 ways to landing short term work.

Getting the Job

Consider All Your Options Before Choosing Your Temp Job

Some temporary jobs may lead to full time employment or a career. If you have more than one option to consider, sit down and think them through.

Then decide which job is the best choice for your situation. Consider time, pay, hours, benefits, and if there’s a chance to secure a full time position.

 Don’t Overdo Your Resume

Avoid stuffing your resume with information that will shout ‘overqualified.’ If you appear too qualified to a recruiter or temporary agency representative, it could make it more difficult for you to land any short term work.

Instead of dropping big names and corporate jargon in your resume, focus instead on your work ethic and how well you work with people. Don’t lie on your resume, but tone it down.

Prepare for the Interview

When preparing for the interview, keep the company’s and the interviewer’s perspectives in mind. An interviewer needs to know three things: Are you qualified? Will you fit in? And, will you cause any issues?

 Use the interview to show off your people skills and your maturity. If you’re overqualified for the position, emphasize you’re great with people and you get along with everyone.

Related: The Top 7 Reasons Why You Should Consider Temporary Freelance Work

Stay Genuine

Regardless of how much debt you’re in, or how you got laid off from the company you’ve been with for over 20 years, avoid going over the top with any unfortunate situations. If all you do is talk about your grievances, your employer could read it as insincere and desperate.

Be Honest

Don’t lie. But also be honest with your employer about whether or not you’d like to work long term in the future. If you don’t plan on turning your freelance or short term job into anything long term, be up front. That way, there aren’t any surprises for your employer once you’re hired.

If you’re looking for seasonal work, internships, consulting gigs, and freelancing work, check out our page to learn more about how we can connect you with employers.

 

 

 

 

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Top 7 Reasons Why You Should Consider Temporary Freelance Work

Non-traditional jobs have risen over the years. More employers are hiring employees for temporary positions. It’s easier and more convenient to hire short term staff for certain projects. Today, many companies use their temporary positions to gauge who they’d like to hire full time. Here are 7 reasons why you should consider freelance work.

Employers in Every Industry Seek Freelance Work

Most people assume being a freelancer or freelancing is only for writers. But that isn’t the case. Every industry is looking to hire freelancers. From engineering to customer service to sales to business positions, and more.

Flexible Hours

One of the biggest benefits of freelance work, temporary or long term, is you can make your own schedule most of the time. You can schedule your work around a schedule that works best for you.

Freelance Jobs

This allows you to schedule in more work and pay that you otherwise may not have received at a standard 9-5 job. You can work unlimited overtime and get paid for it.

You Can Work for More than One Employer

Along with being able to work as many hours as you want, you aren’t tied down to more than one employer. Thousands of companies seek freelancers for temporary positions every day. If you want to seek full time employment through seasonal work and short term work, you are able to do that.

 Related: 5 Ways to Land a Temp Job

Pay Can Be Negotiable

Depending on experience, of course. But if you have experience or have impressive skills or a resume, you can negotiate for a higher pay rate.

It Provides Valuable Work Experience

This is a biggie for college students and recent graduates who haven’t begun their career search. For those who want to gain experience while in school, it can make it easier to land a job once you graduate.

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Temporary Freelance Work

There Are Plenty of Great Opportunities

Many employers are turning their positions into contracting, consulting, and freelancing positions. If job seekers aren’t open to short term work, they could be missing out on many great job opportunities for employment.

You Can Work Remotely

If driving to work or taking public transportation aren’t viable options for you, you can work remotely from home. There is an array of positions in every industry seeking employees. Not being restricted to a cubicle or office all day has its benefits. Plus, if you ever need to travel, you can work from anywhere and don’t have to worry about taking time off.

Joining a website aimed toward short term work and temporary positions can help you on your job search. Explore Short Stints today to begin your job hunt.

 

©Copyright 2016 Short Stints

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3 Secrets to Scoring the Internship of Your Dreams

There can be a lot of competition when it comes to landing an internship, whether paid or volunteer. They can improve your chances of landing your dream job, give you invaluable experiences, and get your foot in the door with the employer you’re doing the internship with.

Scoring a New Temp Job

It’s important to look at an internship as a job or potential career. After all, the process of securing an internship is similar to landing a job. Just like any job, there is a process to getting hired. You to want catch an employer’s attention so you’re more likely to land temporary positions like internships.

Let’s look at 3 tips to scoring your prized internship.

Keep an Eye Out for Non-Summer Internships

Many companies are looking to fill internships needs year round. They aren’t limited to the summer. Internship terms (summer, fall, spring, etc.) can usually be found on the company’s website. If not, inquire about opportunities. Even volunteering to do a free internship with an employer who doesn’t have an internship program in place can get you where you want to be.

In addition, there are a lot of online opportunities for internship jobs. For opportunities that aren’t near where you live, you can still gain valuable work experience by working remotely from home. Be creative and proactive.

Related: 5 Ways to Land a Temp Job

Use All Your Experiences

When filling out internship applications and creating your resume, think outside the box. Experience isn’t limited to the jobs you’ve had, especially if you’ve never had a job. Volunteer work, extracurricular activities, course work, and unrelated jobs can be used to show off your desired skills and qualifications.

Employers have low expectations for interns compared to their employees. Make an impression by showcasing your skills and work experience in every form. Be sure to highlight the top 3 skills and qualifications they’re looking for.

End with a Thank You

Treat the internship process like you’re applying for a job. After you’ve been interviewed, follow up with a thank you. Hand-write a note and send it out in the mail. It shows you’re willing to put more effort in to the things you do.

It also shows employers you’re really interested in the job, you’re proactive, and you’re professional. Plus, it’ll keep you on their mind. You want to stand out from the sea of applicants they’ve interviewed.

 Looking for internships? Sign up to connect with employers looking to fill freelancing, consulting, and temporary positions.

 

 

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Today’s “Entry Level”: The Ins and Outs of Internships

Today’s job market is not what it once was. There was a time when “entry level” implied that no experience was necessary, and a solid academic record was the only prerequisite for a quality job. The value of a bachelor’s degree is today diluted, and employers now commonly demand an experiential background where they once might not have.

Entry Level Internship

Enter the internship, a rite of passage for students and graduates alike. A resume without any is one that an employer is likely to pass over, so job seekers are well-advised to participate. Internships range from competitive, high-paying posts to the commonly maligned unpaid position. Critics of the latter condemn them as exploitative and insubstantial, but in many cases such judgment is unduly harsh. Let’s take a moment to evaluate the tradeoffs between paid and unpaid internships.

As you begin your search for a meaningful position, you should rid yourself of a couple common misconceptions. The first is that paid internships are by definition higher quality, and the second is that unpaid positions are only offered by employers who are cheap. Here is the simple reality: the likelihood of securing a paid position depends on the field in which you are seeking one. The more lucrative the industry, the more money companies will have at their disposal, and thus the more likely you are to find paid work in that field. Areas like education and social services will have fewer paid positions than industries like financial services or advertising, but this speaks little to the inherent quality of the work. As you search, manage your expectations with this in mind. If you’re seeking a position in a lucrative field, be skeptical of unpaid posts. Conversely, if you’re after work in a public service field, be aware that many meaningful positions will probably be unpaid.

While nothing about unpaid positions makes them inferior by definition, they hold one key disadvantage aside from the obvious. With a paid position, there is a consistent incentive for your employer to saddle you with substantive work—the company needs to ensure they are seeing a return on the money they invest in employing you. This incentive does not exist with an unpaid position. With these, it’s more likely that you’ll act as a reinforcement rather than occupy a more structured niche. This is not a rule however, and again, much depends on the field. You are much more likely to be making copies and coffee runs as an unpaid intern at an advertising agency than you would at a school that truly needs you but simply doesn’t have funds to pay.

At the end of the day, the quality of the work you will do should be your foremost priority when seeking an internship—it is a stepping stone, and future employers will look at how substantive your contributions were above how well you were paid for them. Whether you are looking at paid or unpaid positions, be sure to ask probing questions and do your best to establish what your role will be before you formally accept anything. As always, we will be happy to help you navigate this process during any point.

Click to access => Temporary Positions, Permanent Experiences

©Copyright 2016 Short Stints

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